What are bonito flakes?


More and more people have become aware of bonito flakes.

In 2004, I first encountered bonito flakes in Tokyo.
At that time, in Tokyo I was practising the martial art kendo. After evening training, I was invited to the home of my teacher and his family, where we ate dishes from the classic Japanese cuisine. There I noticed the thin flakes with a smoky fish flavor, which was used as a kind of topping on the dishes.

In 2006 when I was trained as a sushi chef abroad, I got to know bonito flakes very well. I found out that the fish Bonito is related to tuna. It is a fish that is filleted, smoked and dried for a long period of time. The dried bonito is than shaved into thin flakes.

Bonito flakes are a solid ingredient in Japanese cuisine, which is used in many different ways. The fish bonito together with other Japanese ingredients form the foundation of Japanese cuisine.

In the Noodle Soup course for beginners, you learn, among other things how bonito flakes are used in Japanese soups in Tokyo.

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Zoë has lectured and held sushi courses for A. P. Moller – Maersk, Hugo Boss Nordic, Novo Nordisk, Novartis, Velux, Gorrissen Federspiel, Beierholm revision, Elbek & Vejrup and many more.

When is sake used in Japanese dishes?

Sushi chef & sake sommelier Zoë Escher
Sake is widely used in Japanese cuisine.
When sake is used is a little different, it depends on the dish. That, of course, must fit. Sake is added to dishes a bit in the same way, such as white wine or red wine in European cuisine.

However, not all types of sake are suitable for cooking. There are large selections of sake that are only suitable for drinking.
In Japan, several different types of sake are produced for cooking. It does not matter what kind of cooking sake are poured into the dish, as they taste very different.
You can, without knowing it, change the whole taste of the dish in question by pouring ”wrong” sake into the food.

Traditional Japanese food course for beginners you get a thorough introduction to the different types of sake used in Japanese cuisine. You will also learn when and in what dishes the different sake should be used.

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Zoë has lectured and held sushi courses for A. P. Moller – Maersk, Hugo Boss Nordic, Novo Nordisk, Novartis, Velux, Gorrissen Federspiel, Beierholm revision, Elbek & Vejrup and many more.

Where does Japanese gyoza come from?

Gyoza
The Japanese dumplings also called gyoza comes from China. Yep, it’s good enough.
China is world famous for making many different types of dumplings in fish, seafood, meat and with various vegetables.

Several thousand years ago, dumplings came from China to Japan. One type of the Chinese dumplings found its way to Japanese cuisine. Japanese chefs chose to change the ingredients and made the dumpling with Japanese flavors.
In this way, dumpling was given the unique flavors and aromas that characterize Japanese food.

Japanese Gyoza is today a regular part of Japanese cuisine. It is a kind of dish that can either be enjoyed as a snack, appetizer or main course. There are several different options.

In Traditional Japanese food course for beginners, you will learn step by step how to make Japanese gyoza as Japanese chefs in Tokyo.

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Zoë has lectured and held sushi courses for A. P. Moller – Maersk, Hugo Boss Nordic, Novo Nordisk, Novartis, Velux, Gorrissen Federspiel, Beierholm revision, Elbek & Vejrup and many more.

Why do ramen noodles have a yellow color?

Ramen noodles originally come from China noodles that have had a permanent place in Chinese cuisine for thousands of years.
When ramen noodles came to Japan, it was adapted to Japanese cuisine by Japanese chefs using Japanese ingredients to make the noodles.

The ingredients used to make ramen noodles are wheat flour, salt, water and kansui. Kansui is alkaline water from Mongolia. It helps to give the ramen noodles the unique yellow color.
In Japan, there is only one type of ramen noodles that is whether it is dried ramen noodles or homemade noodles.

Ramen noodle soup is the most popular fast food in Japan. It is a dish that does not take many minutes to make once you have the foundation in place. It is a dish that fits into a busy everyday life.

In the Noodle Soup course for beginners, you will learn how to make different kinds of tasty Japanese noodle soups.

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Zoë has lectured and held sushi courses for A. P. Moller – Maersk, Hugo Boss Nordic, Novo Nordisk, Novartis, Velux, Gorrissen Federspiel, Beierholm revision, Elbek & Vejrup and many more.

What is Japanese gyoza?


Japanese gyoza are in fact Japanese dumpings.

Originally, Japanese gyoza comes from China. China is known for making many different kinds of dumplings with fish, meat, seafood or a combination of it all.

When the Chinese dumplings came to Japan many years ago, the Chinese dumplings were adapted to Japanese cuisine. Other raw materials were used. The dough sheets used to make Japanese gyoza are made with classic ingredients used in Japanese cuisine.

Japanese chefs made their own interpretation of gyoza. It became like a banner bearer for all other gyoza that have since come into being. The Japanese chefs also developed their very own hand techniques used to fold the Japanese gyoza.

The actual preparation of gyoza is another. A gyoza must go through several steps before it is ready to be eaten.

In the Traditional Japanese food course for beginners, you will learn how to make gyoza as they are served in restaurants in Tokyo.

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Zoë has lectured and held sushi courses for A. P. Moller – Maersk, Hugo Boss Nordic, Novo Nordisk, Novartis, Velux, Gorrissen Federspiel, Beierholm revision, Elbek & Vejrup and many more.

Do the Japanese use European vegetables in traditional Japanese cuisine?

In Japan, many universal vegetables such as onions, carrots, cabbage and potatoes are used in traditional Japanese cuisine and, it ranges from a bento box to a stew.

There is a large selection of local vegetables, root vegetables and herbs that only grow in Japan. Each season in Japan offers several different local herbs and vegetables. It makes Japanese cuisine very lively.

The Japanese prefer to eat vegetables and herbs when in season. They taste best and contain the most vitamins and minerals when in season.

This means that the dishes are regularly replaced at the many eateries and restaurants. It is often a new experience to go out and eat.

Read more about Traditional Japanese dishes for beginners

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Zoë has lectured and held sushi courses for A. P. Moller – Maersk, Hugo Boss Nordic, Novo Nordisk, Novartis, Velux, Gorrissen Federspiel, Beierholm revision, Elbek & Vejrup and many more.

Are there less expensive and tasty Japanese dishes in Japan?

In Japan there are many tasty, healthy and affordable food dishes that also match a low income budget without compromising on quality.
Many Japanese are living a busy life for everyday where they work 10-15 hours a day. When they get home they are too tired to cook, so they prefer to eat on the way home

In Tokyo there are many small eateries that make quick and tasty dishes that also match small budgets.

Read more about the course Traditional Japanese cooking class for beginners

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Zoë has lectured and held sushi courses for A. P. Moller – Maersk, Hugo Boss Nordic, Novo Nordisk, Novartis, Velux, Gorrissen Federspiel, Beierholm revision, Elbek & Vejrup and many more.

Gem

What characterizes Japanese food?

What characterizes Japanese cuisine and Japanese cuisine is that the portions are often very small.
During a meal eat Japanese 6-8 different dishes that contain little fish, vegetables, soy sauce and seaweed that are prepared in various ways.

The many small dishes are to make sure you do not feel heavy or stuffed after a meal. The individual dishes are light in texture and very tasty which makes it easier for the body to digest food.

A Japanese dinner covers the entire food chain, so the Japanese get every day what the body needs which is one of the reasons they are the people in the world who live the longest.

Read more about the course Traditional Japanese cooking class for beginners

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Zoë has lectured and held sushi courses for A. P. Moller – Maersk, Hugo Boss Nordic, Novo Nordisk, Novartis, Velux, Gorrissen Federspiel, Beierholm revision, Elbek & Vejrup and many more.